Essays

Erica Mena reviews Valerie Mejer’s Rain of the Future

vmRain of the Future
Valerie Mejer
translated by A.S. Zelman-Doring, Forrest Gander, and C.D. Wright
Action Books, 2013

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Erica Mena: “Attempts to Generate a Field of Potential Translations with Silence”

Attempts to Generate a Field of Potential Translations with Silence

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Liza Flum reviews Hannah Sanghee Park’s The Same-Different

The Same-Different
Hannah Sanghee Park
The Same-Different
Louisiana State University Press, April 2015
ISBN: 9780807160091

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Elena Karina Byrne: “Incongruity and the Captive (an interrupted essay)”

                                                                                                Here into presence, there into absence––
                                                                                                                                                    Heidegger

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Poetry/Essay: LM Rivera


THE CLINICIAN’S KINGDOM

(A POETRY-ESSAY AGAINST MASTERY)

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Liza Flum reviews Jose Perez Beduya’s Throng

Liza Flum reviews Jose Perez Beduya’s Throng

Jose Perez Beduya
Throng
&NOW Books, 2012
ISBN: 9780982315675

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Keith Waldrop: “A Matter of Collage”

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Macaroni Necklace Release Party

Exterior-Alley-Cat-2

What: Macaroni Necklace Release Party
When: April 23rd, 2015
Where: Alley Cat Books 3036 24th Street, San Francisco, CA
Who: MK Chavez, Mg Roberts, Sarah Capp, Stephanie Young, George Phau, and Tom Comitta
Contact: Eric Sneathan at esneathen@gmail.com

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Bay Area Lit Scene: Stupid Fucking Bird

What: Stupid Fucking Bird, a play by Aaron Posner
Where: San Francisco Playhouse, 450 Post Street, San Francisco CA
When: show closed on May 2, 2015
Websites: http://sfplayhouse.org/sfph/stupid-fucking-bird/

Review by Janelle Bonifacio, Feature Writer

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Emily Vogel: Daesin and The Blurred Moment in Rilke’s Poetry

Daesin and The Blurred Moment in Rilke’s Poetry

While much of Rilke’s poetry is set in the tenuous “playing field” of an understanding of incidental existence, Shakespeare’s illustrious line, “all the world’s a stage and all the men and women merely players” unequivocally applies. The collection of Rilke’s poems that I have on my bookshelf was actually a library book which was never returned (don’t tell) and I didn’t set about reading it until the summer of 2014—when I sat on my back porch with a glass of wine and my reestablished habit of smoking, beginning my reading with the Duino Elegies, and then moving on into the Sonnets of Orpheus. But there are some uncollected poems and some from The Book of Hours that I believe deserve more attention than has been given by other scholars and critics. Two poems, “Death Experienced” and an untitled one from Venice (July 1912) struck me as being located on a “stage” if you will, similar to that stage of our existences that Heidegger would refer to as the human being “thrown” into the world, inheriting the Daesin which defines most of Heidegger’s work. I believe this theme (or sentiment) pervades all of Rilke’s work—but even more expansively in the aforementioned poems.

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