Essays

Adam Fagin: “This Story Must Be Told”

Documentary Poetry in the Gaps and Silences

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Naropa Writing, part 1

This is part one of a three-part essay composed at Naropa’s Summer Writing Program in 2016 by Avren Keating, OmniVerse staff writer.
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Poetry/Essay: Carmen Giménez Smith

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Adam Fagin: “Story I Cannot Tell”

This is a story I’ve told forever: My great-grandfather dies, leaving his wife, Celia, with three small children: Jake, Shimmy, and Sam.

He dies one year after my grandfather’s birth, it is 1919, leaving my great-grandmother to raise a family alone.

They live in Springfield, Massachusetts.

It is the Prohibition. The point is: they live through this untimely death.

At this point in the story, the United States government has banned the manufacture and sale of alcoholic beverages. Celia, my great-grandmother, becomes a bootlegger.

This story is about survival: it’s about family, but it’s also about home.

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Sara Burant reviews Laura Sims’ Staying Alive

Staying Alive
Laura Sims
Ugly Duckling Presse, 2016
ISBN: 978-1-937027-62-9

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Charles Theonia reviews Jamie Berrout’s Postcard Poems

098570da8a086001-098570da8a086002Postcard Poems
Jamie Berrout
2016

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Elena Karina Byrne: “Voyeur Hour”

Looking and looking causes time to open.
—Mark Doty

I love his eyes. They are little larger than what he sees.
—Paul Valery

Our eyes have become voracious like mouths.
—Ann Hamilton

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Mary Cisper reviews Lisa Fishman’s 24 Pages and other poems

24 Pages and other poems
Lisa Fishman
Wave Books, 2015
ISBN: 9781940696102

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Elena Karina Byrne: “THE ORPHAN OF SILENCE (An Interrupted Essay)”

                        I just knew they had to be silent… the pain is not out in the room, the pain
                        in ourselves is invisible, inside ourselves.

                                                            –– Bill Viola

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Pablo Lopez: “NOTE ON THE POEM AS A SITE OF UNINTERRUPTED INTERSECTIONS”

Poiein: to make. No matter the numerous etymological routes, one arrives at to make. The emphasis is not on the maker. The maker: the poet, though active, is not the action. The making is the thing. The all-important thing: performing a range of possibility.

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