Interviews

First Verse: David Koehn and Jazzy Danziger

First Verse is a series of conversations between David Koehn and another poet who has recently had a first book accepted or won a first book prize. These conversations navigate the process and experience of conceiving, developing, and bringing a first manuscript to its final form as a finished book.

167202_658032655152_3100165_36935578_5304065_n(1)Jazzy Danziger’s debut collection, Darkroom, was the winner of the 2012 Brittingham Prize in Poetry. Danziger studied at Washington University in St. Louis and the University of Virginia, where she was a Henry Hoyns/Poe-Faulkner Fellow in poetry. She currently lives in St. Louis, Missouri, where she serves as the series editor for the Best New Poets anthology.

 

 

 

imageDavid’s poetry and translations were previously collected in two chapbooks, Tunic, (speCt! books 2013) a small collection of some of his translations of Catullus, and Coil (University of Alaska, 1998), winner of the Midnight Sun Chapbook Contest. David’s first full length manuscript, Twine, now available from Bauhan Publishing, won the May Sarton Poetry Prize. David’s poetry has appeared in a wide range of literary magazines including Kenyon Review, New England Review, Alaska Quarterly Review, Rhino, Volt, Carolina Quarterly, New York Quarterly, Diagram and many others. David Koehn received his MFA from the University of Florida, Bachelors from Carnegie Mellon, is an essayist for OmniVerse, and Chair of Omnidawn’s Advisory Board.

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Turner Canty interviews Brian Blanchfield

Bb-nyc-2014 Brian Blanchfield is the author of two books of poetry–Not Even Then (University of California Press) and A Several World, (Nightboat Books, 2014)–as well as a chapbook, The History of Ideas, 1973-2012 (Spork Press). His collection of essays, Onesheets, is forthcoming from Nightboat in 2015. His recent poetry and prose appear in many publications, including The Nation, The Brooklyn Rail, A Public Space, Guernica, The Paris Review, Lana Turner, The Poetry Project Newsletter, Boston Review, and Brick. An editor for Fence, he lives in Tucson, where he teaches creative writing at the University of Arizona.

Turner Canty is an Omnidawn poetry editor and features writer. He lives in Oakland, and his writing can be found in Fence, 580 split, and several other magazines.

A poem by Brian Blanchfield follows the interview.

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First Verse: David Koehn and Jane Lewty

First Verse, a new feature of OmniVerse, is a series of conversations between David Koehn and another poet who has recently had a first book accepted or won a first book prize. These conversations navigate the process and experience of conceiving, developing, and bringing a first manuscript to its final form as a finished book.

JaneLewtyJane Lewty is the author of Bravura Cool (1913 Press: 2013) which was the winner of the 1913 First Book Prize in 2011, selected by Fanny Howe. Currently, she lives and works in Amsterdam.

imageDavid’s poetry and translations were previously collected in two chapbooks, Tunic, (speCt! books 2013) a small collection of some of his translations of Catullus, and Coil (University of Alaska, 1998), winner of the Midnight Sun Chapbook Contest. David’s first full length manuscript, Twine, now available from Bauhan Publishing, won the May Sarton Poetry Prize. David’s poetry has appeared in a wide range of literary magazines including Kenyon Review, New England Review, Alaska Quarterly Review, Rhino, Volt, Carolina Quarterly, New York Quarterly, Diagram and many others. His essays and reviews have appeared online and in print across a similar variety of magazines.

David Koehn received his MFA from the University of Florida, is a Vice President at a technology company, is an Angel investor as part of the Sand Hill Angels, and an Account Director at the pro bono volunteer organization Taproot, is an essayist for OmniVerse, and a father of five.

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Poets, Presses & Periodicals: Horse Less Press

A regular feature of OmniVerse, Poets, Presses & Periodicals is a conversation with the publisher of a small press or periodical, a poet they have chosen to highlight, and one of our OmniVerse staff writers.

In this installment, a poem and audio recording of the featured poet, Kirsten Jorgenson, follows the conversation.

Pepper PhotoPepper Luboff holds an MFA in poetry from the University of Utah, where she first met the wonderfully smart and sassy Kirsten Jorgenson. Since that first year of graduate school together in 2005, Kirsten has been Pepper’s dear friend and literary arts ally. In fact, if it weren’t for Kirsten and her husband, Nathan Hauke, Pepper might have drifted away from poetry. The two helped keep her in the fold by soliciting a chapbook from her for their imprint, Ark Press. Last spring, Ark Press brought Pepper’s And when the time for the breaking into being. In addition to her chapbook, Pepper has been published in Colorado Review, Projector Magazine, Drunken Boat, and Poetry Flash.

Jen Tynes PhotoJen Tynes is the founding editor of Horse Less Press. She is the author of two full-length books, The End Of Rude Handles (Red Morning Press) and Heron/Girlfriend (Coconut Books), and the author or coauthor of about a dozen chapbooks, most recently Here’s the Deal (Little Red Leaves Textile Series) and New Pink Nudibranch (Shirt Pocket Press). Her third full-length book, Trick Rider, is forthcoming this spring from Trembling Pillow Press. She lives in Western Michigan and, with Michael Sikkema, cohosts Poetry & Pints, a monthly reading series.

Kirsten Jorgenson PhotoKirsten Jorgenson is from Salt Lake City, Utah, via Chicago, Illinois. She is the author of one full-length collection of poetry, Sediment & Veil, which is forthcoming from Horse Less Press. She is also the author of two chapbooks, Deseret (Horse Less Press, 2011) and Accidents of Distance (Dancing Girl Press, 2012), and coauthor of the poetics chapbook Country Music (DoubleCross Press, 2013). She lives in Western North Carolina with her son, dog, and partner, Nathan Hauke, with whom she coedits Ark Press and cocurates the Ark Press Summer Reading Series.

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Lisa Wells interviews Emilia Phillips

Emilia PhillipsEmilia Phillips is the author of Signaletics (University of Akron Press, 2013) and two chapbooks including Bestiary of Gall (Sundress Publications, 2013). Her poetry appears in Agni, Beloit Poetry Journal, Green Mountains Review, Gulf Coast, Hayden’s Ferry Review, Indiana Review, The Journal, The Kenyon Review, Narrative, The Paris-American, Poetry Magazine, Third Coast, and elsewhere. She’s the recipient of the 2012 Poetry Prize from The Journal, selected by G.C. Waldrep; 2nd Place in Narrative’s 2012 30 Below Contest; and fellowships from Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, U.S. Poets in Mexico, Vermont Studio Center, and Virginia Commonwealth University where she received her MFA in poetry in 2012. She serves as the prose editor for 32 Poems, a staff member of the Sewanee Writers’ Conference, and as the 2013–2014 Emerging Writer Lecturer at Gettysburg College.

Lisa Wells is a poet and essayist. She’s the author of the chapbook BEAST (Bedouin, 2012), and a book of essays, Yeah. No. Totally. (PDP, 2011). Her work appears or is forthcoming from Third Coast, The Rumpus, Austin Review, Southern Humanities Review, Coldfront, and others. Born and raised in Portland, Oregon, she currently lives in Iowa City where she’s an MFA candidate in poetry at the Writers’ Workshop.

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Poets, Presses & Periodicals: Albion Books

A regular feature of OmniVerse, Poets, Presses & Periodicals is a conversation with the publisher of a small press or periodical, a poet they have chosen to highlight, and one of our OmniVerse staff writers.

In this installment a poem and audio recording of the featured poet, Frank Sherlock, follows the conversation.

Pepper Luboff Photo EditedPepper Luboff is a writer and editor with an MFA in poetry from the University of Utah. Her poems have appeared in Colorado Review and Projector Magazine, and her chapbook, And when the time for the breaking, was released last spring by Ark Press. She’s written features for Drunken Boat and Poetry Flash, and she’s a reader for Zoetrope: All-Story and Zoetrope’s screenplay contest. She also reviews art, in its many forms, on her blog Pigeon Review.

Brian Teare Photo EditedA former NEA Fellow, Brian Teare is the recipient of poetry fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, the Headlands Center for the Arts, and the American Antiquarian Society. He is the author of four books—The Room Where I Was Born, Sight Map, the Lambda Award–winning Pleasure, and Companion Grasses. He’s also published seven chapbooks, most recently Helplessness, [ black sun crown ], and SORE EROS. An Assistant Professor at Temple University, he lives in Philadelphia, where he makes books by hand for his micropress, Albion Books.

Frank Sherlock Photo EditedFrank Sherlock is the author of the soon-to-be-released Space Between These Lines Not Dedicated, Over Here, The City Real & Imagined (w/ CAConrad), and a collaboration with Brett Evans entitled Ready-to-Eat Individual. Por Aquí, a Spanish-language collection of works translated by Carlos Soto-Román, will be published in Chile in fall 2014. Poems beyond the page have found their forms in installations/performances/exhibitions, including Refuse/Reuse: Language for the Common Landfill, Kensington Riots Project, Neighbor Ballads, and B. Franklin Basement Tapes. Sherlock is a recipient of the 2013 Pew Fellowship in the Arts for literature. He is currently Poet Laureate of Philadelphia.

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ZombieVerse: RJ Ingram and Alisha Karabinus on Resurrection

This month, OmniVerse features works revived from lost and out-of-print publications, curated by RJ Ingram. The following is a conversation between RJ and Alisha Karabinus, editor of Revolution House, on resurrecting our fallen texts.

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Poets, Presses & Periodicals: Noctuary Press

A regular feature of OmniVerse, Poets, Presses & Periodicals is a conversation with the publisher of a small press or periodical, a poet they have chosen to highlight, and one of our OmniVerse staff writers.

In this installment a poem and audio recording of the featured poet, Kristy Bowen, follows the conversation.

Pepper Luboff Photo EditedPepper Luboff is an Oakland-based writer, editor, and artist with an MFA in creative writing from the University of Utah. Her chapbook And when the time for the breaking was published in spring by Ark Press. She is a regular writer for Drunken Boat and a reader for Zoetrope: All-Story. She also reviews art, in its many forms, on her blog Pigeon Review at pepperluboff.wordpress.com.

Kristy Bowen PhotoA writer and artist, Kristy Bowen’s work has appeared most recently in Projectile, Birdfeast, and Stolen Island. She is the author of several written (and sometimes visual) endeavors, including the prose projects beautiful, sinister (Maverick Duck Press, 2013) and the shared properties of water and stars (Noctuary Press, 2013). She lives in Chicago, where she runs dancing girl press & studio. Her collection of poetry, girl show, is due out this fall from Black Lawrence Press.

Kristina Marie Darling Photo EditedKristina Marie Darling is the author of fifteen books, which include Melancholia (An Essay) (Ravenna Press, 2012), Petrarchan (BlazeVOX Books, 2013), and a forthcoming hybrid genre collection called Fortress (Sundress Publications, 2014). Her awards include fellowships from Yaddo, the Helene Wurlitzer Foundation, and the Hawthornden Castle International Retreat for Writers, as well as grants from the Kittredge Fund and the Elizabeth George Foundation. She is currently working toward a PhD in poetics at SUNY Buffalo.

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Barbara Claire Freeman Interviews Andrew Zawacki

New PictureANDREW ZAWACKI is the author of the poetry books Videotape (Counterpath), Petals of Zero Petals of One (Talisman House), Anabranch (Wesleyan), and By Reason of Breakings (Georgia). His poems have appeared in The New Yorker, The New Republic, The Nation, and elsewhere, and he has published three books in France: Georgia and Carnet Bartleby, both translated by Sika Fakambi, and Par Raison de brisants, a finalist for Le Prix Nelly Sachs, translated by Antoine Cazé. Zawacki’s translation of Sébastien Smirou, My Lorenzo, is out from Burning Deck. A former fellow of the Slovenian Writers’ Association, Zawacki edited Afterwards: Slovenian Writing 1945-1995 (White Pine) and edited and co-translated Aleš Debeljak’s Without Anesthesia: New and Selected Poems (Persea). He is coeditor of Verse, The Verse Book of Interviews (Verse), and Gustaf Sobin’s Collected Poems (Talisman House).

Barbara Claire Freeman is a literary critic and professor of literature who has recently turned her full attention to writing poetry. She is the author of The Feminine Sublime: Gender and Excess in Women’s Fiction (University of California Press, 1998, pbk. 2000), among many other works of literary theory and criticism. Formerly an Associate Professor of English at Harvard, she teaches creative writing and poetics in the Rhetoric Department at the University of California, Berkeley. Incivilities, her first collection of poems, was published by Counterpath Press in November, 2009; a chapbook, St. Ursula’s Silence, was published by Instance Press in 2010. Selections from these collections won the Boston Review/Discovery Prize and the Language Exchange Prize. A second chapbook, titled #343, is forthcoming from Chapvelope Press in the fall of 2013. Recent work has appeared or is forthcoming in A Public Space, Agriculture Reader, Boston Review, Colorado Review, Denver Quarterly, Forklift, Ohio, Jacket 1, Lana Turner, Laurel Review, The Offending Adam, The Volta, Seattle Review, Volt, Washington Square, and Wave Composition, among others.

A new poem by Andrew Zawacki follows the interview.

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Barbara Claire Freeman interviews Graham Foust

Photo 3Graham Foust lives and works in Denver. His latest books are To Anacreon in Heaven and Other Poems (Flood Editions, 2013) and In Time’s Rift (Wave Books, 2012), a co-translation, with Samuel Frederick, of Ernst Meister’s Im Zeitspalt.

Barbara Claire Freeman is a literary critic and professor of literature who has recently turned her full attention to writing poetry. She is the author of The Feminine Sublime: Gender and Excess in Women’s Fiction (University of California Press, 1998, pbk. 2000), among many other works of literary theory and criticism. Formerly an Associate Professor of English at Harvard, she teaches creative writing and poetics in the Rhetoric Department at UC Berkeley.

Incivilities, her first collection of poems, was published by Counterpath Press in November, 2009; a chapbook, St. Ursula’s Silence, was published by Instance Press in 2010. Selections from these collections won the Boston Review/Discovery Prize and the Language Exchange Prize. A second chapbook, titled #343, is forthcoming from Chapvelope Press. Recent work has appeared or is forthcoming in A Public Space, Agriculture Reader, Boston Review, Colorado Review, Crazyhorse, Denver Quarterly, Forklift, Ohio, Jacket 1, Lana Turner, Laurel Review, The Offending Adam, The Volta, Seattle Review, Volt, Washington Square, and Wave Composition, among others.

A poem by Graham Foust is included in the interview.

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